Marriott-Slaterville mayor regrets not pushing tougher towards BDO venture | Information, Sports activities, Jobs

0

1/3

The new Business Depot Ogden warehouses on the east side of 1200 West, photographed March 9, 2022. Their construction remains a sore point to residents of Marriott-Slaterville across the roadway to the west.

Tim Vandenack, Standard Examiner

2/3

Marriott-Slaterville Mayor Scott Van Leeuwen is pictured in an undated photo.

Photo supplied

3/3

The new Business Depot Ogden development on the east side of 1200 West in Ogden, photographed March 9, 2022. The photo is looking west to a home across 1200 West in Marriott-Slaterville. The project remains a sore point to residents of the neighboring city.

Tim Vandenack, Standard Examiner

❮ ❯

The new Business Depot Ogden warehouses on the east side of 1200 West, photographed March 9, 2022. Their construction remains a sore point to residents of Marriott-Slaterville across the roadway to the west.

Marriott-Slaterville Mayor Scott Van Leeuwen is pictured in an undated photo.

The new Business Depot Ogden development on the east side of 1200 West in Ogden, photographed March 9, 2022. The photo is looking west to a home across 1200 West in Marriott-Slaterville. The project remains a sore point to residents of the neighboring city.

MARRIOTT-SLATERVILLE — The seven warehouses at the center of the new development in Business Depot Ogden abutting the city of Marriott-Slaterville are up and getting what appear to be the finishing touches.

Nonetheless, the head-shaking by Marriott-Slaterville residents upset over the new structures, which actually sit in Ogden, and the work it’s taken to build them continues. Most recently, Marriott-Slaterville Mayor Scott Van Leeuwen sent a three-and-a-half-page letter to Business Depot Ogden officials asking for a range of measures to mitigate the impacts of the work on city residents and expressing exasperation over the lingering matter .

The warehouses, on the east side of 1200 West in Ogden on what had been vacant BDO land, measure up to 45-feet high, casting a shadow on the homes on the west side of 1200 West, which is in Marriott-Slaterville. They also block the views from the homes of the Wasatch Front mountains to the east.

“If I could go back in time, I would have fought Ogden city from ever constructing these warehouses on the border during my watch,” Van Leeuwen wrote in the letter, dated March 7. He had understood that “lower-profile” office buildings would be built in the BDO space in question and said building the warehouses “was a poor decision on the part of BDO and not within the spirit of the original BDO reuse plan.”

Among the issues Van Leeuwen mentions are pooling water between 1200 West and the new warehouses, planned landscaping to block the view of the warehouses, loss of wireless internet service by Marriott-Slaterville residents because of the tall new buildings and more. Aside from BDO reps, he sent the letter to Ogden officials, state lawmakers representing the area, US Rep. Blake Moore and US Sen. Mitt Romney.

Aaron Austad, the BDO director of operations, was out of the office and not immediately available for comment on Thursday. However, Cameron Cook, manager of leasing, said the BDO had responded to Van Leeuwen. The City of Ogden owns the BDO.

“We did receive the letter and mailed the mayor a response detailing what has been done up to this point and what we are doing moving forward,” Cook said in a message on Thursday to the Standard Examiner. He didn’t delve into details of the response and both Van Leeuwen and Bill Morris, the Marriott-Slaterville city attorney, said as of midday Thursday that they hadn’t received the BDO letter.

Mark Johnson, chief administrative officer for Ogden, was among those who received Van Leeuwen’s letter. Not being directly involved, he referred comment on the BDO’s response to Austad, but said the city has been mindful of the Marriott-Slaterville worries and responsive to concerns coming from the neighboring city.

“I think that Boyer’s doing more than they’re given credit for,” Johnson said.

Short of removing the warehouses along 1200 West, he went on, he doesn’t think the Marriott-Slaterville residents across the street will ever be satisfied. BDO and city officials have said the development complied with applicable guidelines.

In fact, Van Leeuwen isn’t completely pessimistic in his appraisal.

Some “very positive things” will come out of the project, including planned burial of utility lines now strung along power poles, he said. He also thinks the planned landscaping meant to shield residents’ view of the warehouses will be a “big improvement.”

Still, the warehouse project — which Austad had previously said would be done by April — lingers on as a sore point. “I’ve had people move out of the city just because of it,” Van Leeuwen said.

He’d like Ogden and BDO reps to meet with impacted Marriott-Slaterville residents over their assertions that the value of their property has declined because of the project. In his letter, the Marriott-Slaterville mayor also alluded to several other issues:

  • He’d like higher berms between 1200 West and the new warehouses to better obstruct homeowners’ view of the new structures.
  • He expressed concern over pooling water on the east side of 1200 West, proposing installation of an engineered storm drain. “As it is presently, it is a muddy mess, and this spring will become a mosquito hazard with standing water after storms,” Van Leeuwen wrote.
  • Blowing dust from the BDO to Marriott-Slaterville homes to the west is a continuing issue, potentially violating Ogden city code. “This dust is coming from properties owned by Ogden city. I feel that a city should be an example to its residents by following its own ordinances,” Van Leeuwen wrote.
  • Lights placed on some of the new warehouse buildings are also an issue. “Please do whatever you can to tone down the lighting and especially keep it turned off on 1200 West and at 400 North,” Van Leeuwen wrote.
  • Access to wireless internet remains an issue for some who rely on it because the warehouses obstruct wireless signals. A BDO solution isn’t working, the mayor said, and he asked for an update from Ogden officials on the possible extension of a Comcast line to serve the impacted residents.

“Also, this letter clarifies that Marriott-Slaterville city is united in supporting our residents on 1200 West and 400 North in mitigating the adverse impacts caused by BDO,” the mayor wrote in the letter.

Newsletter

Join thousands already receiving our daily newsletter.

Leave A Reply

Your email address will not be published.