David Beckham digitally aged to be 70 within the new malaria prevention marketing campaign

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David Beckham has been digitally aged to look 70 years old in a haunting new campaign calling for action against malaria.

The former professional footballer, 45, was unrecognizable when he got gray curls, age spots and wrinkles in the campaign “Malaria Must Die That Millions Can Live” that he has to travel to the future with to see the disease end.

The clip showed a before and after shot of the digital aging process and presented David in an imaginary future where malaria had been wiped out when he declared that “our world has changed”.

After: The former professional footballer, 45, had gray curls, age spots and wrinkles in the Malaria Must Die campaign so that millions can live

Changes: David Beckham had digitally aged to look 70 when he called for action to prevent malaria-related deaths in a new campaign released Wednesday

David said that as a father of four, he took the fight to eradicate the disease personally.

“The fight against malaria is very important to me because the disease remains a major death for children and we have an opportunity to change that in our lives.”

The campaign was launched by the Malaria No More UK charity and was published at a time when the government is planning to reduce the amount of foreign aid.

The charity fears the cut in aid budget will hit the countries most at risk of the disease.

In the startling footage, David’s tattoos looked faded and his forehead was deeply lined as he stood side by side.

While his current beard and mustache are speckled with gray, fast forward to the future, he’s completely gray.

The short film shows him on stage to show that one of the oldest and deadliest diseases in the world has finally been won.

Since the film is set in 2050, Beckham is telling the audience that malaria no longer kills thousands of children every year.

As he speaks, the former Manchester United star visually returns to his present age, informing his audience that a malaria-free future is only possible if we continue the fight.

Beckham’s future face was created by filmmakers to imagine himself being 30 years older and letting the world know that the fight against malaria has been won.

David said: “I have been working with Malaria No More UK since 2009, supporting campaigns and helping to shed light on the challenge.

“Your campaigns always use great creativity and innovation to draw attention to the topic, and I am delighted to have met some of the inspiring people who are working so hard to end this disease.”

Aged: David's tattoos were not only old but also faded when he stood side by side for the video campaign

Aged: David’s tattoos were not only old but also faded when he stood side by side for the video campaign

Call to Action: David Said:

Call to Action: David said: “The fight against malaria is very important to me because the disease remains a major death for children and we have the opportunity to change that.”

The campaign video also showed David posing in a green room when he had just digitally aged.

Malaria is a life-threatening tropical disease that is transmitted by mosquitoes.

According to the World Health Organization (WHO), it is one of the greatest killers in the world, killing a child every two minutes.

Most of these deaths occur in Africa, where 250,000 young people die from the disease each year.

Good Thing: David is a founding member of Malaria No More UK's leadership council, which is also running the campaign (pictured in a promotional photograph for the charity).

Good Thing: David is a founding member of the leadership council of Malaria No More UK, which is also running the campaign (pictured in a promotional photograph for the charity).

Malaria is caused by a parasite called Plasmodium, five of which cause malaria.

The Plasmodium parasite is mainly spread by female Anopheles mosquitoes.

When an infected mosquito bites a person, the parasite enters their bloodstream.

David is a founding member of the Leadership Council of Malaria No More UK, which also leads the campaign.

Dr. Pedro Alonso, director of the World Health Organization’s global malaria program, said of the campaign: “The emergence of Covid-19 has shown the world how critical our health systems are.

‘It is crucial that the world is back on track in 2021 to meet existing malaria reduction goals if we are to get out of the pandemic.

“By investing in ending malaria, we will not only save lives that would otherwise be lost to this deadly disease. We will also protect current health systems from the dual burden of malaria and other diseases like Covid-19. ‘

David isn’t the only famous face working with Malaria Must Die. Millions of campaigns can live like this, as Hugh Laurie, Emeli Sande and Peter Capaldi also played in earlier clips.

David first got into it more than a decade ago when he launched Malaria No More when he was playing tennis with Andy Murray at Wembley Stadium over the world’s longest mosquito net.

Good Thing: On Monday, David and his wife Victoria attended a video for Elton John's AIDS Foundation on World AIDS Day

Good Thing: On Monday, David and his wife Victoria attended a video for Elton John’s AIDS Foundation on World AIDS Day

The film, which will be released on Thursday and can be seen on YouTube, was filmed in a theater in London earlier this year.

One of the contributors was Ingrid Etoke, who works for an organization that is looking for new ways to fight malaria.

She said, “When I grew up in Cameron, West Africa, I always had the malaria chill on me. I have suffered from malaria many times and lost my cousins ​​to the disease.

“But it doesn’t have to be like that. I believe that in the not too distant future we will conquer disease. ‘

Beckham’s digital broadcast was made possible by a company run by Hollywood director Ridley Scott.

They used a face-swapping technology called Charlatan, which uses machine learning to bring different faces together in real time.

WHAT IS MALARIA?

Malaria is a life-threatening tropical disease that is transmitted by mosquitoes.

According to the World Health Organization (WHO), it is one of the greatest killers in the world, killing a child every two minutes.

Most of these deaths occur in Africa, where 250,000 young people die from the disease each year.

Malaria is caused by a parasite called Plasmodium, five of which cause malaria.

The Plasmodium parasite is mainly spread by female Anopheles mosquitoes.

When an infected mosquito bites a person, the parasite enters their bloodstream.

Symptoms are:

  • fever
  • Feel hot and trembling
  • a headache
  • Vomit
  • muscle pain
  • diarrhea

These usually appear between a week and 18 days after infection, but can last up to a year or sometimes even longer.

People should see a doctor right away if they develop symptoms during or after visiting an area affected by malaria.

Malaria occurs in more than 100 countries, including:

  • Large areas of Africa and Asia
  • Central and Central America
  • Haiti and the Dominican Republic
  • Parts of the Middle East
  • Some Pacific Islands

A blood test will confirm a diagnosis.

In very rare cases, malaria can be transmitted through blood transfusions.

For the most part, malaria can be prevented by using insect repellants, wearing clothing that covers your limbs, and using an insecticide-treated mosquito net.

Malaria prevention tablets are also often recommended.

Treatment that includes anti-malarial drugs usually results in a full recovery if done early enough.

If left untreated, the infection can lead to severe anemia. This occurs when the parasites invade red blood cells, which then break open and reduce the number of cells overall.

And cerebral malaria can occur when the small blood vessels in the brain become blocked, causing seizures, brain damage, and even coma.

Source: NHS decisions

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